Frequently Asked Questions

Links to Faq's for:

Criminal History Records FAQ's

   1. Question: What is the procedure for obtaining a criminal history record check on myself?

Answer: There are several options available: 1) Review of Criminal History Information (PDF) by sending the DPS a complete authorized fingerprint card including the appropriate fee; 2) visit any DPS FAST location in your area; or conduct an on-line name-based search using the C.R.S. Public Site.


   2. Question: What is the difference between a name-based criminal history search and a fingerprint–based criminal history search?

Answer: A fingerprint-based search is the most accurate method available returning records based on matching fingerprints; a name-based search has a greater potential to match multiple candidates as the search relies on a comparison of similar sounding names or, if requested, names spelled exactly alike.  With a name based search it is possible to match against records that do not relate to the person in whom you are interested, and it is possible to miss the record that does relate to the person in whom you are interested.


   3. Question: May I send in old fingerprint cards to obtain my criminal history record check?

Answer: No. Fingerprint cards should not be older than 6 months old.


   4. Question: Is it possible to receive a certified notarized record check; and if so, is there an additional fee?

Answer: Your record check will be certified and notarized upon your request; there is no additional charge for this service.


   5. Question: How is Fingerprint Applicant Services of Texas (FAST) associated with fingerprinting and criminal history record checks?

Answer: The DPS contracted fingerprinting service, FAST offers a complete suite of electronic fingerprinting services designed to provide authorized entities with the capability to obtain fingerprint-based criminal history checks for job applicants, licensees, volunteers, etc.


   6. Question: What documentation is needed before I can be fingerprinted at a FAST location when requested by a licensing agency or for employment purposes?

Answer: A person being fingerprinted at a FAST location may need to complete a FAST Pass form which will be supplied by the employing/licensing agency (including their Agency Identification Number), driver's license or other valid form of identification and the form of payment selected when the appointment was made; the FAST Pass form is provided by the requesting agency.


   7. Question: What is the procedure for obtaining a criminal history record check on someone other than myself?

Answer: Please visit our C.R.S. Public Site to conduct an online name-based search. Under Texas law, deferred adjudication and conviction records are considered public information and may be made available the general public.


   8. Question: What is the cost of a fingerprint-based criminal history record check?

Answer: The fee for a fingerprint based record check is $15.00.


   9. Question: What is the cost of a name-based criminal history record check?

Answer: The fee for a name-based record check is $10.00 if done off-line through DPS. Visit the C.R.S. Public Site for specific online search fees.


   10. Question: What is the cost to just be fingerprinted?

Answer: MorphoTrust USA (formerly L-1 Identity Solutions)-FAST charges $9.95. Law enforcement agencies may charge up to $10.00.


   11. Question: Where can I go to be fingerprinted?

Answer: Persons looking for a FAST location can make an appointment by logging on to the MorphoTrust USA (formerly L-1 Identity Solutions) website, or by calling 1-888-467-2080 between 8am and 5pm Central Time.


   12. Question: How long does it take to get a criminal history record check?

Answer: Once the information is received, it may take approximately 10 business days for the results. We cannot guarantee the amount of time it may take to receive this information through the postal service.


   13. Question: Can anyone have access to my criminal history record?

Answer: Under Texas law, deferred adjudication and conviction records are considered public information and may be made available the general public. Please visit our C.R.S. Public Site to conduct an online name-based search.


   14. Question: Will Texas DPS records reflect every arrest that I may have?

Answer: The Department of Public Safety is the criminal history repository for the State of Texas; our records are comprised of information submitted by criminal justice agencies only within the State of Texas. If a deferred case has resulted in probation, although the case has been deferred and the terms of probation satisfied, the arrest and probation will remain on file.


   15. Question: How long will arrest information appear on my criminal history record?

Answer: Criminal arrest information will remain on a criminal history record indefinitely.


   16. Question: How can I have arrest or court information removed from my criminal history record?

   17. Question: How do I check the status of fingerprints submitted to DPS?

Answer: Call (512) 424-5079 or email fingerprint.service@dps.texas.gov to check on the status of your request.


   18. Question: Why does my criminal history record reflect a Class C citation?

Answer: The Department of Public Safety will retain Class C arrest if reported. Arresting agencies are not mandated to report Class C arrests but have the option to.


   19. Question: Why did my employer find my arrest on a public website and not with the Department of Public Safety?

Answer: The arrest should be reflected on the Department of Public Safety's website. If it's not reflected on your criminal history record, the arrest was either never reported or returned to the arresting agency due to an error.


   20. My employer conducted a background check through the Department of Public Safety website. My arrest is showing but my criminal history record does not reflect the disposition, why?

Answer: If the case went to court it is the responsibility of the clerk of the court exercising jurisdiction to report the disposition to the Department of Public Safety. If your criminal history record does not reflect the disposition, the disposition was never reported or returned to the agency due to an error.


   21. The Board of Nursing has conducted a background check and received results containing my juvenile offense but I was under the impression that this information was supposed to be automatically sealed. Why can they still see my information?

Answer: Juvenile information is available to entities that are authorized to CHRI under 411.084. Juvenile records that have been restricted are only available to criminal justice agencies.


   22. My employer conducted a background check and received results that I have a criminal history record. What is the procedure to obtaining a criminal history check?

Answer: You will need to request a personal review. You can find the instructions at http://www.txdps.state.tx.us/InternetForms/Forms/CR-63.pdf. A certified copy of your results will be mailed back to the address provided to at the time you scheduled your appointment.


   23. What data is included in Computerized Criminal History System (CCH)?

Answer: Chapter 60, Code of Criminal Procedure requires that information on arrests, prosecutions and disposition of the case for persons arrested for Class B misdemeanor or greater violation of Texas criminal statues be included in CCH.


   24. How many counties are included in the Texas statewide search?

Answer: Texas has 254 counties that submit criminal data to be included in CCH.


   25. Is there a website with court addresses and phone numbers:

Answer: Yes, you may refer to http://www.courts.state.tx.us or www.txdirectory.com.


   26. I located my criminal court disposition from a private company. Will this be sufficient to submit to the Department of Public Safety?

Answer: To correct and/or update missing disposition data, you must contact the court of jurisdiction and request a certified copy of the disposition. Once you have obtained the certified court document, you will need to forward it to CRS Error Resolution Unit for updating to your criminal history record. Be advised photo static copies are not acceptable unless they contain an embossed (raised design) seal from the issue court.


   27. Question: How to challenge the criminal history record information contained in a Texas Record?

Answer: Please visit http://www.txdps.state.tx.us/administration/crime_records/pages/errorresolution.htm to receive a full explanation on the procedures to challenge the criminal history record information contained in a Texas record.


   28. Question: How to challenge the criminal history record information contained in an FBI Record?

Answer: Please visit http://www.fbi.gov/about-us/cjis/background-checks/challenge-of-a-criminal-record to receive a full explanation on the procedures to challenge the criminal history record information contained in an FBI record.



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Texas Sex Offender Registration Program FAQ's

   1. Question: When did sex offender registration in Texas start?

Answer: The first sex offender registration laws in Texas went into effect on September 1, 1991. These laws have been amended every legislative session since.


   2. Question: Who is required to register as a sex offender in Texas?

Answer: Any person (1) with a "reportable conviction or adjudication," (2) required to register as a condition of parole or release to mandatory supervision, (3) required to register as a condition of community supervision, or (4) is an “extrajurisdictional registrant” must register as a sex offender. Prior to September 1, 1997, the sex offender registration laws were prospective in application; therefore, a person convicted of or adjudicated for a sex offense before the law required registration for the offense did not have to register. On September 1, 1997, the registration requirement was made retroactively applicable to any person whose "reportable conviction or adjudication" occurred on or after September 1, 1970, but only if the person was in the Texas criminal justice system on or after September 1, 1997 for that offense.  Finally, on September 1, 2005, the registration requirement was made retroactively applicable to every person whose “reportable conviction or adjudication” occurred on or after September 1, 1970, regardless of whether the person was in the Texas criminal justice system on or after September 1, 1997 for that offense.


   3. Question: What is a "reportable conviction or adjudication?"

Answer: Article 62.001(5) of the Code of Criminal Procedure defines "reportable conviction or adjudication" as follows:

Article 62.001. Definitions

(5) "Reportable conviction or adjudication" means a conviction or adjudication, including an adjudication of delinquent conduct or a deferred adjudication’ that, regardless of the pendency of an appeal, is a conviction for or an adjudication for or based on:

(A) a violation of Section 21.02 (Continuous sexual abuse of a young child or children), 21.11 (Indecency with a child), 22.011 (Sexual assault), 22.021 (Aggravated sexual assault), or 25.02 (Prohibited sexual conduct), Penal Code;

(B) a violation of Section 43.05 (Compelling prostitution), 43.25 (Sexual performance by a child), or 43.26 (Possession or promotion of child pornography), Penal Code;

(C) a violation of Section 20.04(a)(4) (Aggravated kidnapping), Penal Code, if the actor committed the offense or engaged in the conduct with intent to violate or abuse the victim sexually;

(D) a violation of Section 30.02 (Burglary), Penal Code, if the offense or conduct is punishable under Subsection (d) of that section and the actor committed the offense or engaged in the conduct with intent to commit a felony listed in Paragraph (A) or (C);

(E) a violation of Section 20.02 (Unlawful restraint), 20.03 (Kidnapping), or 20.04 (Aggravated kidnapping), Penal Code, if, as applicable:

(i) the judgment in the case contains an affirmative finding under Article 42.015; or

(ii) the order in the hearing or the papers in the case contain an affirmative finding that the victim or intended victim was younger than 17 years of age.

(F) the second violation of Section 21.08 (Indecent exposure), Penal Code, but not if the second violation results in a deferred adjudication;

(G) an attempt, conspiracy, or solicitation, as defined by Chapter 15, Penal Code, to commit an offense or engage in conduct listed in Paragraph (A), (B), (C), (D), (E), or (K);

(H) a violation of the laws of another state, federal law, the laws of a foreign country, or the Uniform Code of Military Justice for or based on the violation of an offense containing elements that are substantially similar to the elements of an offense listed under Paragraph (A), (B), (C), (D), (E), (G), (J), or (K), but not if the violation results in a deferred adjudication;

(I) the second violation of the laws of another state, federal law, the laws of a foreign country, or the Uniform Code of Military Justice for or based on the violation of an offense containing elements that are substantially similar to the elements of the offense of indecent exposure, but not if the second violation results in a deferred adjudication;

(J) a violation of Section 33.021 (Online solicitation of a minor), Penal Code; or

(K) a violation of Section 20A.02(a)(3), (4), (7), or (8) (Trafficking of persons), Penal Code.


   4. Question: Do sex offenders from other states have to register as a sex offender in Texas?

Answer: Yes, if the sex offender’s conviction is a "reportable conviction or adjudication" and the offender resides, works or attends school in Texas. As stated above, "reportable conviction or adjudication" includes a conviction or adjudication of delinquent conduct (juveniles) under the laws of another state for an offense containing elements that are substantially similar to the elements of a Texas offense that requires registration.

The Texas Department of Public Safety determines whether an offense under the laws of another state contains elements that are substantially similar to the elements of a Texas offense that requires registration.


   5. Question: Do sex offenders convicted under federal law, military law or the laws of another country have to register as a sex offender in Texas?

Answer: Yes, if the sex offender’s conviction is a “reportable conviction or adjudication” and the offender resides, works or attends school in Texas. As stated above, “reportable conviction or adjudication” includes a conviction or adjudication of delinquent conduct (juveniles) under federal law, the Uniform Code of Military Justice or the laws of another country for an offense containing elements that are substantially similar to the elements of a Texas offense that requires registration.

The Texas Department of Public Safety determines whether an offense under federal law, the laws of a foreign country, or the Uniform Code of Military Justice contains elements that are substantially similar to the elements of a Texas offense that requires registration.

If the Department determines an offense under federal law, the laws of a foreign county, or the Uniform Code of Military justice does not contain elements that are substantially similar to the elements of a Texas offense that requires registration, then this sex offender will have to register if the convicting body of law requires the person to register.


   6. Question: When does a nonresident sex offender have to register as a sex offender in Texas?

Answer: A sex offender who resides outside of Texas must register as a sex offender in Texas if the offender has a “reportable conviction or adjudication” and works or attends school in Texas. The duty to register for this type of sex offender expires when the offender stops working or attending school in Texas.


   7. Question: Who does a sex offender register with?

Answer: A sex offender registers with the local law enforcement authority of the municipality (the office of the chief of police) where the offender resides. If the offender does not reside in a municipality, the offender registers with the local law enforcement authority of the county (the office of the sheriff) where the offender resides. Registration must be completed not later than the later of (1) the seventh day after the date the offender arrives in the municipality or county; or (2) the first date the local law enforcement authority of the municipality or county by policy allows the person to register.

If a sex offender resides outside of Texas but works or attends school in Texas, the offender registers with the local law enforcement authority of the municipality or county where the offender works or attends school.

When the offender registers with the local law enforcement authority of the municipality or county where the offender resides, works or attends school, that local law enforcement authority then becomes the offender’s primary registration authority.


   8. Question: What information does a sex offender provide the local law enforcement authority?

Answer: The Texas Sex Offender Registration Program requires a local law enforcement authority to obtain the following information from the sex offender:

  1. the person’s full name, date of birth, sex, race, height, weight, eye color, hair color, social security number, driver’s license number, shoe size, home address or a detailed description of each geographical location at which the person resides or intends to reside, each alias, and any home, work or cellular phone number of the peson;
  2. a recent color photograph or, if possible, an electronic digital image of the person and a complete set of the person’s fingerprints;
  3. the type of offense the person was convicted of, the age of the victim, the date of conviction, and the punishment received;
  4. an indication as to whether the person is discharged, paroled, or released on juvenile probation, community supervision, or mandatory supervision;
  5. an indication of each business, occupational, or professional license, certificate, permit, or other authorization issued by a licensing authority that is held or sought by the person;
  6. an indication as to whether the person is or will be employed, carrying on a vocation, or a student at a particular public or private institution of higher education in this state or another state, and the name and address of that institution;
  7. the identification of any “online identifier” established or used by the person; and
    8. any other information required by the Texas Department of Public Safety.

   9. Question: What does the local law enforcement authority do with the information provided by a registered sex offender?

Answer: The local law enforcement authority will maintain the registration locally, provide notification to schools, if required, and submit all sex offender registration information to the Texas Department of Public Safety for inclusion on the DPS Sex Offender Database.


   10. Question: Does the public have the right to access sex offender registration information maintained by a local law enforcement authority and the Texas Department of Public Safety?

Answer: The Texas Sex Offender Registration Program specifically classifies sex offender registration information as public information with a few exceptions. The only information not available to the public is a sex offender’s social security number, driver’s license number, any home, work or cellular telephone number, “online identifier,” an employer’s name, address, or telephone number, any additional information required by the Texas Department of Public Safety, or information that would identify the victim of the offense.

Non-public information also includes a juvenile sex offender’s registration information ordered nonpublic by a juvenile court.

Public sex offender registration information may be obtained from the Texas Department of Public Safety at any time via the Department’s website located at https://records.txdps.state.tx.us/DPS_WEB/SorNew/index.aspx


   11. Question: What is a numeric risk level?

Answer: The numeric risk level indicates the level of risk a sex offender poses to the community. A numeric risk level is assigned to each sex offender when the offender is released from a penal institution or placed on community supervision or juvenile probation. It is determined by using the sex offender screening tool adopted by the Risk Assessment Review Committee. There are three different risk levels:

  • Level one (low): indicates that the person poses a low danger to the community and will not likely engage in criminal sexual conduct.
  • Level two (moderate): indicates that the person poses a moderate danger to the community and may continue to engage in criminal sexual conduct.
  • Level three (high): indicates that the person poses a serious danger to the community and will continue to engage in criminal sexual conduct.

   12. Question: How long does a sex offender have to register?

Answer: Adult sex offenders register either for life or ten years following discharge from state supervision (i.e. incarceration, parole, or community supervision).

Lifetime registration is required for the following offenses:

1. a “sexually violent offense” – the following offenses committed by a person 17 years of age or older:

  • continuous sexual abuse of young child or children (Section 21.02, Penal Code);
  • indecency with a child by contact (Section 21.11(a)(1), Penal Code);
  • sexual assault (Section 22.011, Penal Code);
  • aggravated sexual assault (Section 22.021, Penal Code);
  • sexual performance by a child (Section 43.25, Penal Code);
  • aggravated kidnapping, if committed with the intent to violate or abuse the victim sexually (Section 20.04(a)(4), Penal Code);
  • burglary (Section 30.02, Penal Code), if the premises burglarized was a habitation and the offense was committed with the intent to commit continuous sexual abuse of young child or children, indecency with a child, sexual assault, aggravated sexual assault, prohibited sexual conduct, or aggravated kidnapping committed with the intent to violate or abuse the victim sexually; and
  • an offense under the laws of another state, federal law, the laws of a foreign country, or the Uniform Code of Military Justice if the offense contains elements that are substantially similar to the elements of one of the above Texas offenses.

2. trafficking of persons (Section 20A.02(a)(3, (4), (7), or (8).

3. prohibited sexual conduct (Section 25.02, Penal Code);

4. compelling prostitution of a minor (Section 43.05(a)(2), Penal Code);

5. possession or promotion of child pornography (Section 43.26, Penal Code);

6. indecency with a child by exposure (Section 21.11(a)(2), Penal Code), if before or after being convicted or adjudicated for this offense, the person receives or has received another reportable conviction or adjudication, other than an adjudication of delinquent conduct, for an offense or conduct that requires registration; and

7. unlawful restraint (Section 20.02, Penal Code), kidnapping (Section 20.03, Penal Code), or aggravated kidnapping (Section 20.04, Penal Code) and the judgment in the case contains an affirmative finding that the victim or intended victim was younger than 17 years of age and, if before or after the person is convicted or adjudicated for one of these offenses, the person receives or has received another reportable conviction or adjudication, other than an adjudication of delinquent conduct, for an offense or conduct that requires registration.

8. obscenity (Section 43.23, Penal Code), if the punishment is increased due to the obscene material visually depicts a “child” engaging in sexually explicit activities.

Adult sex offenders will register for 10 years following discharge from state supervision for any offense that does not require a lifetime registration (i.e. attempted sexual assault and second indecent exposure).

Juvenile sex offenders, those who register on the basis of an adjudication of delinquent conduct, register until the 10th anniversary of the date on which the disposition of their case was made or the juvenile completes the terms of the disposition, whichever date is later.

Juvenile sex offenders, those who register on the basis of a conviction or an order of deferred adjudication in a juvenile case that was transferred to a district or a criminal district court, register until the 10th anniversary of the date on which the offender was discharged from state supervision of their case was made or the juvenile completes the terms of the disposition, whichever date is later.

Extra jurisdictional registrants will register on the date the offender’s duty to register would expired under the laws of the foreign county had the offender remained in that foreign county, under federal law, or under the Uniform Code of Military Justice, as applicable.


   13. Question: What is a sex offender required to do after the sex offender registers with the local law enforcement authority?

Answer: Registered sex offenders are required to provide accurate registration and verification information to the offender’s local law enforcement authority and primary registration authority, respectively.   Sex offenders accomplish this by periodically verifying their registration information as well as by notifying the primary registration authority of any change in address, “online identifiers,” the offender’s name, physical health, job status, or educational status.

Verification of Registration Information

All registered sex offenders must periodically report to the offender’s primary registration authority to verify the offender’s registration information. Offenders civilly committed as a sexually violent predator must verify their registration information once in each thirty-day period. Sex offenders with two or more “sexually violent offense” must verify their registration information once in each ninety-day period. All other sex offenders must verify their registration information once each year.

Changes of Address

Registered offenders must report all changes in address to the proper primary registration authority.

If the offender moves within Texas, this is accomplished by:  (1) not later than the seventh day before an intended change in address, the offender shall report in person to the offender’s primary registration authority and report the intended change in address and (2) not later than the seventh day after the offender arrives at the new address in Texas, the offender shall report in person to the local law enforcement authority of the municipality or county in which the offender’s new residence is located and provide that authority with proof of identity and proof of residence. This local law enforcement authority will then become the offender’s new primary registration authority.

If the offender moves outside of Texas, this is accomplished by:  (1) not later than the seventh day before an intended change in address, the offender shall report in person to the offender’s primary registration authority and report the intended change in address and (2) not later than the 10th day after arrival in the other state, the offender shall register with the law enforcement agency that is identified by the Texas Department of Public Safety as the agency designated by that state to receive registration information.

Changes in “Online Identifiers,” the Offender’s Name, Physical Health, Job Status, or Educational Status

In addition to providing notification of all address changes, not later than the seventh day after a change in an “online identifier,” the offender’s name, physical health, job status, or education status, the offender shall report this change to the offender’s primary registration authority.

Employment or Enrollment at Institutions of Higher Education

Not later than the seventh day after the offender begins to work at or enrolls in a public or private institution of higher education (university, college, community college, or technical or trade institution), the offender shall notify the following entities of this fact:  (1) the authority for campus security (i.e. campus police department) and (2) the offender’s primary registration authority.

Not later than the seventh day after the offender terminates work at or enrollment in a public or private institution of higher education, the offender shall notify the following entities of this fact:  (1) the authority for campus security (i.e. campus police department) and (2) the offender’s primary registration authority. 


   14. Question: What does a registered sex offender have to do if he or she regularly visits a municipality or county other than the municipality or county he or she is registered in?

Answer: A registered sex offender who on at least three occasions during any month spends more than 48 consecutive hours in a municipality or county, other than the municipality or county in which the offender is registered, must report that fact to the local law enforcement authority of the municipality or county in which the offender is visiting. In reporting this fact to the proper local law enforcement authority, the sex offender must provide all the information that is required for sex offender registration, the address of any location in the municipality or county at which the offender was lodged during the month, and a statement as to whether the offender intends to return to the municipality or county during the succeeding month.


   15. Question: Can sex offenders obtain an exemption from registration?

Answer: :   Any juvenile sex offender may seek either a court order exempting the juvenile from registration or, alternatively, a court order classifying registration information as nonpublic. The exemption of adult offenders is very limited. Generally, an adult offender may ask a court for an exemption only if (1) the offenses resulted in a conviction or deferred adjudication community supervision for indecency with a child (Section 21.11, Penal Code) or sexual assault (Section 22.011, Penal Code); (2) the victim was at least 15 years of age and the offender was not more than four years older than the victim, at the time of the offense, and (3) the offense involved consensual conduct. Additionally, adult sex offenders may ask a court for an early termination of registration after the offender has received an individual risk assessment and by explaining how the reportable conviction or adjudication’s registration period exceeds the minimum required registration period under the federal law. 


   16. Question: What happens if a person required to register fails to comply with any requirement in the Texas Sex Offender Registration Program?

Answer: It is a felony offense if a person required to register fails to comply with any requirement under the Texas Sex Offender Registration Program.


   17. Question: How is the public notified of registered sex offenders living in their community?

Answer: Community notification of sex offenders is provided in several different ways.

Governmental Immunity

Certain governmental bodies are given immunity for releasing public information. The Texas Department of Public Safety, a penal institution, a local law enforcement authority, or an authority for campus security may release to the public information regarding a person required to register only if the information is public information.

The DPS Sex Offender Database>

Local law enforcement authorities submit all sex offender registration information to the Texas Department of Public Safety. The Texas Department of Public Safety puts this information in the DPS Sex Offender Database. The public may obtain information contained in this database at any time via the Texas Department of Public Safety website. The DPS Sex Offender Database can be accessed at https://records.txdps.state.tx.us/DPS_WEB/SorNew/index.aspx

Postcard Notification of Civilly Committed and High-Risk Offenders

When the Texas Department of Public Safety receives notice that a sex offender either civilly committed as a sexually violent predator or assigned a high-risk level is due to be released into a community or intends to move to a new address, the Texas Department of Public Safety will provide written notice in English and Spanish to the immediate community where the sex offender intends to reside. This written notice will be in the form of a postcard mailed or delivered to at least each address (excluding post office boxes) within a one-mile radius, in an area that has not been subdivided, or a three-block area, in an area that has been subdivided, of the place where the civilly committed or high-risk sex offender intends to reside.

Newspaper Publication

Local law enforcement authorities are permitted to publish all high-risk sex offenders in any newspaper, periodical or circular in the area where the offender intends to reside.

School Notification

In some cases, a local law enforcement authority must notify the superintendent of a public school district and administrator of a private primary or secondary school located in the school district that a registered sex offender is residing within the school district. Sex offenders subject to school notification are offenders (1) whose victim was either younger than 17 years of age or a student enrolled in a public or private secondary school, (2) enrolled in a public or private secondary school, or (3) registering for the offense of sexual performance by a child (Section 43.25, Penal Code) or possession or promotion of child pornography (Section 43.26, Penal Code). Prohibited sexual conduct (Section 25.02, Penal Code) offenders are specifically excluded from this school notification requirement.


   18. Question: Are registered sex offenders allowed to live or go near places frequented by children such as schools and playgrounds?

Answer: The Texas Sex Offender Registration Program itself does not prohibit registered sex offenders from living or going near places frequented by children. However, Texas community supervision and parole laws, as well as city ordinances, may require the imposition of a "child safety zone.”  A "child safety zone" prohibits certain individuals from going in, on, or within a specified distance of a premise where children commonly gather (i.e. schools, day care facilities, or playgrounds). A violation of the "child safety zone" can result in the revocation of the offender’s probation or parole, or a citation.


   19. Question: Are registered sex offenders prohibited from working in certain trades, occupations or professions?

Answer: The Texas Sex Offender Registration Program itself does not prohibit registered sex offenders from working in certain trades, occupations or professions. However, state law regulating  a particular trade, occupation or profession may bar sex offenders from working in the trade, profession or occupation. To determine if a registered sex offender is prohibited from working in a particular trade, occupation or profession, the law regulating the trade, occupation or profession must be reviewed.  Furthermore, the following prohibition exists for certain sexually violent offenses pursuant to Texas Code of Criminal Procedure Ch. 62.063 where on or after September 1, 2013 an affirmative finding is made that a sexually violent offense had been committed on a victim younger than 14.   This law states that a person who has a reportable conviction for a sexually violent offense that also contains an affirmative finding that the victim is under the age of  14, may not: 

  1. Operate or offer to operate a bus
  2. Provide or offer to provide a taxicab or limousine transportation service
  3. Provide or offer to provide any type of service in the residence unless the provision of service will be supervised
  4. Operate or offer to operate any amusement ride

A sexually violent offense  is defined under Texas Code of Criminal Procedure Ch. 62.001(6) as the following offenses if committed by a person 17 years of age or older:

  • Continuous sexual abuse of young child or children
  • Indecency with a Child
  • Sexual Assault
  • Aggravated Sexual Assault
  • Sexual Performance of Child
  • Aggravated Kidnapping , if the offender committed the offense with intent to violate or abuse victim sexually
  • Burglary, if the offense is punishable under subsection (d) of the burglary statute and the defendant committed the offender with intent to commit a felony listed above (or a Burglary with intent to commit Prohibited Sexual Conduct)
  • An offense under the laws of another state, federal law laws of a foreign country, or Uniform Code of Military Justice that contain elements that are substantially similar to the elements  of offenses listed above

   20. Question: What do I need to do in order to report a person on the registry as deceased and have them removed from the website?

Answer: Make contact with the local law enforcement agency in which he/she was registering with prior to passing and be prepared to provide proof that the person is in fact deceased.

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