Texas Emergency Management ONLINE 2016 Vol. 63 No. 5

Texas Emergency Management Briefs, Tips and Links

USGS LAUNCHES REAL-TIME FLOOD MONITORING WEBSITE

Texas Water Dashboard

U.S. Geological Survey launched a new web-based program to give users real-time information about water levels, forecasts and emergency situations across the state.

The Texas Water Dashboard combines USGS water measurements with National Weather Service forecasts to allow users to use social media and mobile devices to get a live look at the conditions in their area and what to anticipate.

The dashboard is currently a webpage that allows Texas residents a customized view of their location. Users can add layers to the map that show rainfall forecasts, severe weather watches and more.

Additionally, the program includes two twitter feeds, @USGS_TexasFlood and @USGS_TexasRain that automatically update when water levels rise or drop to certain levels.

The program went live Thursday and Pearson said there are plans to add an app for mobile access in the future. Currently, mobile users can access the site on a phone's browser, but may not be able to access all of the functionality.

A release from the USGS described the program as:
"A cutting-edge map that provides critical current water information and NWS forecast data at your fingertips on a desktop, smartphone or other mobile device. This is a first-generation product that brings real-time USGS data together in a web mashup with information from the NWS and other sources. The USGS will explore the potential value of this product to the public, and could possibly expand its reach to include the rest of the nation in the future."

USGS Texas Water Dashboard.
Information from KVUE Austin

SNAKE SIGHTINGS INCREASE AS SEASON GETS ACTIVE

Western  Diamondback Rattlesnake

Snake sightings are being reported across Texas. The most active snakes right now include the venomous western diamondback rattlesnake in the Austin area.

It's breeding season for most species and our daytime temperatures are not too hot.

Experts suggest that:

  • make sure tall grass is mowed
  • be diligent in checking yards before letting pets and children play
  • if you see a snake, always walk away or spray it with a garden hose

Some Texans mistake the non-venomous rat snake as a rattlesnake because the rat snake vibrates its body and makes a similar sound.

People can understand that we can live alongside these animals and there are ways to keep yourself safe and still allow the snakes to exist.

The venom is used in medical research for cancer, high blood pressure, stroke and more. It's also used to make the rattlesnake vaccine for dogs.

If you suffer a snake bite, call 9-1-1 immediately. Medical personnel, such as EMS, can rate the severity of the bite and if you require antivenin as well as assess the risk of anaphylactic shock. EMS can call ahead to the hospital to prepare it, which takes about twenty minutes.

Texas Parks and Wildlife Snake Education

Information from KEYE-TV Austin FEMA RECOVERY ASSISTANCE FOR SEVERE WEATHER IN TEXAS

Register and apply for assistance by calling FEMA at 1-800-621-3362 or 1-800-462-7585 (hearing impaired) or visiting www.disasterassistance.gov. Call center hours: are 7:00 AM – 10:00 PM CST

Recent Presidential Declarations

For information on disaster assistance for the March 2016 severe weather, please follow this link.
For information on disaster assistance for the May 2015 severe weather, please follow this link.
For information on disaster assistance for the October 2015 severe weather, please follow this link.
For information on disaster assistance for the December 2015 severe weather, please follow this link.

FEMA RECOVERY ASSISTANCE FOR SEVERE WEATHER IN TEXAS
Register and apply for assistance by calling FEMA at 1-800-621-3362 or 1-800-462-7585 (hearing impaired) or visiting www.disasterassistance.gov. Call center hours: are 7:00 AM – 10:00 PM CST

Recent Presidential Declarations
For information on disaster assistance for the March 2016 severe weather, please follow this link.
For information on disaster assistance for the May 2015 severe weather, please follow this link.
For information on disaster assistance for the October 2015 severe weather, please follow this link.
For information on disaster assistance for the December 2015 severe weather, please follow this link.

HURRICANE PREPAREDNESS WEEK

#ItOnlyTakesOne
#HurricaneStrong 

Hurricane Preparedness Week is May 15 – 21, 2016. It only takes one storm to change your life and community. Tropical cyclones are among nature’s most powerful and destructive phenomena. If you live in an area prone to tropical cyclones, you need to be prepared. Even areas well away from the coastline can be threatened by dangerous flooding, destructive winds and tornadoes from these storms. The National Hurricane Center and the Central Pacific Hurricane Center issue watches, warnings, forecasts, and analyses of hazardous tropical weather.

Hurricane Preparedness Week (May 15-21, 2016) is your time to prepare for a potential land-falling tropical storm or hurricane. Learn how with the daily tips below and related links. Share these with your friends and family to ensure that they're prepared.

Weather-Ready Nation – Hurricane Preparedness


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